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There are pages and pages of safety protocol information which is certai Ichi-F is a graphic memoir about one man's experiences during his time as part of a crew cleaning up the Fukushima nuclear power plant. There are pages and pages of safety protocol information which is certainly not the most stimulating thing to read, but it's well illustrated and tells a unique story that I appreciate having read. Jul 08, Rod Brown rated it it was ok.

Some of this material is interesting, but the presentation is very flat and boring. It took me weeks to get through this as I kept setting it aside to read pretty much anything else. I don't consider it time wasted, because I did learn a lot. Unfortunately, the creator didn't have much insight to offer along with his insider's view of the clean-up following the Fukushima disaster.

This is a POV that you rarely get to hear from regarsing the tsunami and resulting nuclear disaster. You hear rumours, or "news" from various activist groups, from people directly affected by the disaster but I have never seen anything from someone who moved from Tokyo to work in the power plant.

This is not sensational or full of action; rather it showcases the mundane, everyday work that happens at Ichi-F, and the progress that is being made. It takes neither side of the nuclear energy de This is a POV that you rarely get to hear from regarsing the tsunami and resulting nuclear disaster. It takes neither side of the nuclear energy debate, it just shows what the workers encounter on a day to day basis, and that is what makes it so interesting.

I found this an incredibly fascinating read, and it made me wish to visit Fukushima, Miyagi and Iwate prefectures very much! May 12, Ken Yuen added it Shelves: Didn't get past page Aug 03, Brandon rated it liked it. I liked it as it was interesting being that it went into specific and sometimes mundane detail of his day to day experience working as a general labor, but also some of the interesting safety measures and protocols.


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It was not a 50, foot level view point, so there was just a lot that was unknown which at times made it more interesting to be able to more closely relate to his experience, but also a little frustrating not knowing more details of operations on a larger scale. Lastly I now have a I liked it as it was interesting being that it went into specific and sometimes mundane detail of his day to day experience working as a general labor, but also some of the interesting safety measures and protocols.

Lastly I now have a intense desire to visit bath houses in Japan. Sep 08, PvOberstein rated it it was ok. I wanted to like this more than I did. It is, critically, not a history of the disaster itself, but rather a story told from the perspective of one of the workers at the site several years later.

Tatsuta, writing in first-person about his experiences, is clearly a bit of an oddit I wanted to like this more than I did. Tatsuta, writing in first-person about his experiences, is clearly a bit of an oddity. His rationale, as he explains it, is simple curiosity — a desire to see what is actually happening on the ground. Due to the understandable limited public access to the Fukushima site, Japan has clearly been awash with rumors about just what is happening at the site, and Tatsuta seems determined to learn what he can, and then share his knowledge in manga form.

The first thing you realize is that basically no detail is too trivial for Tatsuta to include. He walks the reader through virtually every step of the hiring process, from bouncing between employment agencies in Tokyo, to finding a residence, to getting his different ID cards, to how regularly he gets paid.

Sometimes, though, the reader gets bogged down in the details. Which, indeed, is one of the reasons Tatsuta is writing. Tatsuta disposes many of the conspiracy theories floating about — that Fukushima workers are dying in droves, for example — just through the sheer mundaneness of his details. The biggest shock, admittedly, is just how little these workers are getting paid, more akin to low-end construction work than anything. Tatsuta and many of the Fukushima workers regularly struggle to make ends meet on their meager salaries, exacerbated by the fact that they often rack up living expenses while waiting unpaid for assignments to open up.

Most of them can also work no more than a few weeks or months at Fukushima, before their radiation exposure level is capped for the year. The book suffers somewhat by the fact that there really is no narrative. He seems to be implicitly in favor of the continued use of nuclear power or at least, arguing that it is not really unsafe , though he never makes the case to the reader. The artwork is all very nice, done in a realistic, black-and-white style with little exaggeration.

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Recommended only if this is already your cup of tea. Aug 04, Katja rated it really liked it Shelves: Ichi-F was a fascinating look at people who do the actual work at Fukushima's power plant, preparing the facility for proper decommission. There's a lot of different work at the site but in this manga we see a couple of high-risk jobs and the lower exposure work at the rec center where the workers get their gear, get checked after coming back from "field", take their breaks etc.

There's also quite a bit of the time in-between, sight-seeing and how this manga got started. Tatsuta takes a very matt Ichi-F was a fascinating look at people who do the actual work at Fukushima's power plant, preparing the facility for proper decommission. Tatsuta takes a very matter-of-fact approach to the situation and I think it's a good choice. He says the main reason he wanted to tell about his time at Ichi-F is to give a counterpoint to the sensationalized image the media as given of the power plant.

At some points the manga tries to underline this a bit too blatantly but it's not there on every page; mostly it's just a depiction of the daily life of the men working. The procedures they have to take in order to stay protected and monitored at the site are described many times, so you really understand that the safety is taken very seriously although it is mentioned there was rumours of some shadier companies trying to circumvent radiation dosage limits. Tatsuta doesn't take sides on the nuclear power itself but does give some subtle criticism to the subcontractor system that handles the hiring of the workers.

He also highlights that the progress is made even though it can be slow, and that Fukushima isn't a hopeless wasteland. It's done nicely through mentioning bathhouses opening here and there again, for example. Although the manga's structure can feel a bit jumpy, it's not a big problem. I thought there was an alright balance with actual work on the Ichi-F site and all the other stuff looking for place to live during work, meeting locals, commuting, doing the manga There's also humour there!

It's quite text and detail heavy but it's the meat of this kind of book. There's a lot of practical information how things are done and what kind of equipment is used. I applaud for this! Some things are told multiple times which can feel a bit repetitive when you read the whole omnibus in a short amount of time.

But it's not too bad and because the chapters were originally published in manga magazine, as they do, it's understandable. And it truly gives the weight to the safety measures. The art is fine: All the signs etc. It didn't cause huge inconvenience but there was a few times the flow of reading was disrupted when I had to take a new look at the panels.

I understand it was done to lure non-manga readers to this book too but I don't like it. Overall Ichi-F was interesting and informative, highly recommended. Dec 07, Blue rated it really liked it Shelves: Author using a pseudonym in his manga and hiding his manga-identity from the Fukushima people chronicles working in one of the rec centers where workers take breaks, eat lunch, rehydrate and on one of the clean-up crews in , as well as some more high-radiation-exposure work inside one of the reactors in In between these episodes, Tatsuta reveals how he managed to get on-site work, many levels of contracting companies, the bureaucracy of getting his foot in the door by working some unrelated construction job, which sounds like a scam, but is kind of not , his experiences with Hello Work the governments job finding service , his struggles to draw manga and sell it, and his determination to educate people about radiation exposure and what really is going on in Fukushima now.

Perhaps the most poignant parts of the collected comic serial are those where Tatsuta, a Tokyo native, connects with the locals in and around Fukushima, most of whom have been displaced by the disasters. He visits a temporary home for the elderly and plays and sings songs for them, he visits local defunct train stations, pop-up malls by displaced merchants, local hot springs and spas. He returns to some sights of utter devastation after the tsunami, chronicling the gradual change due to nature taking over as well as clean-up efforts. While the episodes inside the Fukushima jobs focus on the daily toils of the workers lots of changing of clothes, an itchy nose that's trapped inside a mask and cannot be scratched, taking naps in between stressful and high-exposure runs to move huge lead walls to let robots in and out of a reactor, etc.

Tatsuta's art is detail-oriented and expressive. He handles the funny moments and the poignant and sad ones well. He is, in general, a positive sort of guy, so his work comes across as optimistic, which is not a bad way to be in Japan these days. Most importantly, he seems passionate about Fukushima and the region and though he plays it down, he feels responsible for what happened and wants to make a difference.

Recommended for those who like instant noodles, sports drinks, gambling, sweating, welding, and ruins. Nov 09, Benjamin rated it really liked it Shelves: Before reading 1F, I'd seen a variety of reviews online. Thankfully I ignored several of them and read the manga anyway. It's a very detailed story of the life that workers faced and still face at the epicenter of an unimaginable disaster. The value of the manga is that it doesn't attempt to diagnose or encompass the entirety of the Fukushima disaster. There are many other well-researched and compelling books that can offer readers that experience.

What 1F provides is the chance to experience Before reading 1F, I'd seen a variety of reviews online. What 1F provides is the chance to experience the daily routine that defines the perilous existence of those who have chosen to face a set of dangers that most of us would avoid at all costs. It can also be frustrating, especially when it describes the conflicted nature of most employees at the site: The real difficulty lies in assigning some sort of exact valuation to this narrative.

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Its informational content is absolutely indispensable to anyone seriously interested in what's gone on at Fukushima. On the other hand, the artwork is rather pedestrian and you certainly won't get anything in terms of character development. I think that these latter concerns are a much bigger issue for non-Japanese readers because we're just not familiar with the utterly pervasive nature of manga in Japanese society.

Manga is, of course, primarily for entertainment, but it's used for just about anything else too. Westerners may have "XYZ for Dummies" books, but in Japan manga is perfectly acceptable as a mode of communication that encompasses much more serious work. Feb 23, Dan rated it it was ok. As a historical document depicting what it is like for a low level worker during the cleanup in Fukushima, Ichi-F is very detailed and will probably be of great interest to historians in the future.

The artwork is good. The details are very interesting but the overarching narratives that they are couched in aren't really compelling. Tatsuta wants to give you the day to day experiences of being in Fukushima and demystify it and make it less confusing and frightening, but at times that pulls too f As a historical document depicting what it is like for a low level worker during the cleanup in Fukushima, Ichi-F is very detailed and will probably be of great interest to historians in the future. Tatsuta wants to give you the day to day experiences of being in Fukushima and demystify it and make it less confusing and frightening, but at times that pulls too far in the other direction towards things just being dull.

A lot of his working life is just putting on and taking off various layers of protective clothing, so the book is often a lot of putting on and taking off various layers of protective clothing.


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  8. I think the experience of reading it was probably different if you read it as it was serialized over three years instead of compiled into one long book - maybe it doesn't work so well in this format because it was never really meant to be in this format. Jun 19, Elizabeth rated it it was amazing Shelves: I really liked reading about what happened agree the tsunami and its effects. I knew about Fukashima Daiichi through the news in the days after the earthquake and tsunami but not much more than there were problems. Then other things took over and it wasn't news. I liked this because it presents a point of view of someone who has actually been there and was dealing with the actual reality verses what was sound bit for news.

    I did have to read this in chunks because it was so much but it was a lot I really liked reading about what happened agree the tsunami and its effects. I did have to read this in chunks because it was so much but it was a lot to chew on. Reading about all they went through in getting dressed in PPE personal protective equipment was familiar to me from my work in industrial security so I could sympathize with the tediousness of the process.

    Maybe this is some sort of psychological thriller but the protagonist is such a cliche that would be boring , but I think the supernatural element is meant to be taken seriously. I did not Just tossing in a cute oblique reference to The Shining "Now that you mention it, Susanna said, I do find myself thinking of that movie sometimes, That good movie based on the not-so-good book" won't make us overlook the similarity, and then throwing Flatland of all things into the mix does not help at all. If you'd like to make up your own mind, it's short. I read it in about an hour.

    Apr 07, Christine rated it did not like it. I got nothing out of it. I'm glad it was short, thus I only wasted a little of my time. A better title would have been "You Should Have Left Abigail Marie rated it did not like it Jul 14, John Burns rated it did not like it Aug 16, Eli Shallcross rated it did not like it Sep 03, Lamerestbelle rated it did not like it Apr 04, Christian rated it did not like it Apr 22, Esme rated it did not like it Feb 28, Miss Bonsai rated it did not like it Sep 22, Sophie rated it did not like it Oct 28, Emily rated it did not like it Jun 29, Antony rated it did not like it Sep 20, Stacey rated it did not like it Jan 06, Yossi rated it did not like it Jul 25, Yasemin rated it did not like it Jul 31, Carmen rated it did not like it Aug 01, Shana rated it did not like it Mar 20, Patricia Becht rated it did not like it Nov 19, Susanne rated it did not like it Nov 22, Toni Gordon rated it did not like it Jun 19, Ted Beck rated it did not like it Apr 01, Jesse De Angelis rated it did not like it Jul 16, Marcus Steffanci rated it did not like it Mar 11, Ibis rated it did not like it Sep 10, Demy Kozadinou rated it did not like it Aug 26, Daniel Kehlmann is a German-Austrian author.

    His novel Measuring the World was translated into more than forty languages.

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    Kehlmann divides his time between Vienna and Berlin. Books by Daniel Kehlmann. No trivia or quizzes yet. Quotes from You Should Have L