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For example if you are working on an art project and then all of a sudden say "I put your juice on the table", the child may only hear "on the table" while the brain plays catch up. This seems like great advice for not just kids and adults with autism, but ADD, nuero issues and injuries, MR, etc. It is little things like this that can make a world of difference. I've been trying to read all of Grandin's books so I feel more confident when critiquing them but this is the last one for me.

I know this one is a bit old so there are some things about it that can be attributed to that rather than Grandin's opinions but I still take issue with a lot of what she says in the book. She doesn't seem to understand that not all autistic people are capable of or interested in following a life path similar to hers.

Either that or she doesn't care to hear or consider t I've been trying to read all of Grandin's books so I feel more confident when critiquing them but this is the last one for me. Either that or she doesn't care to hear or consider that perspective. In any case, as an autistic person myself, she doesn't speak for me. Oct 09, Jonathan Schildbach rated it liked it.

The title of this book is a bit misleading. That is, I expected that "A Personal Look" would be more focused on Grandin's own life and experiences. Instead, this is a compilation of articles Grandin has written, mostly involving practical advice on how to pursue help for people on the autism spectrum in either school or the work world. There is personal information in it, and she relates information to her own experiences on occasion, but this book is more like an advice book for parents dealing The title of this book is a bit misleading.

There is personal information in it, and she relates information to her own experiences on occasion, but this book is more like an advice book for parents dealing with children on the Autism spectrum and for people who are on the spectrum who need to learn how to move into the working world. Much of the material is repetitive--a lot of 'keep trying until you find the routines and conditions that best work for your child' and 'encourage strengths, don't focus on weaknesses. The writing is also not the strongest.

Some of my pet peeves, such as vague words like "very" and "good" were riddled throughout the book. The advice, generally speaking, is, ahem, good--but for people not dealing regularly with people on the spectrum or not on the spectrum themselves, it becomes tedious. Jun 17, Mochizuki rated it really liked it Shelves: Part biography, part self aggrandizing, part text book, Dr. Grandin takes you into her world of Autism through magazine articles previously published and reorganized into an easier to follow format that incorporates her opinions on the inner workings of Autism and Asperger's.

I loved her comment about -- if it wasn't for Autism we would be a world full of highly social people who would accomplish very little. The Social people are not going to want to spend the time necessary to create great art Part biography, part self aggrandizing, part text book, Dr. The Social people are not going to want to spend the time necessary to create great art, beautiful music, or masterworks of engineering that require a great attention to detail. Instead of thinking about Asperger's as a detriment, it's now easier to see that it can be a gift, the ability to use different parts of the brain that the rest of the population is clueless about.

So, some people are wired differently, may not have the same social skills, but in the long run, if it wasn't for people thinking differently, would I be able use this computer. Would there even be computers? I highly recommend this fascinating book; I just suggest that you take it in small bits so you can digest the full meaning that Dr. Grandin is trying to get across.

Jul 19, Gail rated it really liked it Shelves: Divided into small concise sections about various issues relating to the autistic spectrum. Temple Grandin gives practical information and advice to people on the spectrum and their parents and carers. Her focus is largely on encouraging people on the autistic spectrum to pursue their special interests, and not to try to become something they are not.


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She emphasises that the focus should not be on weaknesses but on strengths. At the same time, she is big on the importance of following Great book. At the same time, she is big on the importance of following certain social etiquette, such as: It felt a bit bitty to read, but then that is because it's a collection of articles she's written over the years, rather than something she wrote as a whole. I think I'd like to read a book she has written as a whole book.

I learned so much from this book, it was incredible. What a helpful, well-written book. Seriously, I am thoroughly impressed. The reason I gave it was 3 stars was because it was repetitive. Because it was a collection of 32 essays, published at different times a lot of the information was told over and over again. Like if I had to hear the story about Temple's boss giving her deodorant, I was going to put the book down. So that was difficult and forced me to push through. Additionally, some of Te I learned so much from this book, it was incredible.

Additionally, some of Temple's assessments were difficult to swallow and a little old fashioned. She does acknowledge this, and she is 63 and comes from a different generation. So it was difficult sometimes to read outdated opinions. I understand this book has had multiple editions, but I still wish there was a more updated one.

That said, the research and the references are so helpful. I can't wait to dig through my notes and highlights for the golden nuggets that will apply to myself and future stories. Jan 09, Agi rated it really liked it. A must read for parents of autistic child, anyone who has to deal with autistic person, anyone who works with public. I would say everyone.

You can understand for example why your co-worker is so weird. And how to deal with it. And make sure you read her other books. But she wouldn't be who she is if it wouldn't be for her mother. Thats why I believe that this book should be taught in school. Feb 26, Emily rated it liked it Shelves: Grandin has written for the Autism Asperger's Digest magazine over the past decade or so, grouped into loose categories. The nature of the format means that the book is somewhat repetitive and choppy with little, if any, transition between the short articles often only pages each.

Grandin provides solid information on how people on the Spectrum think, how to help them broaden their skill sets and deal with sensory issues, with an emphas The Way I See It is a complication of articles Ms. Grandin provides solid information on how people on the Spectrum think, how to help them broaden their skill sets and deal with sensory issues, with an emphasis on discipline and teaching proper appropriate behavior.

Many interesting insights including this one: In many ways, today's 'always connected' society has put more social demands on people, and a lack of social ability may be seen as more of a handicap than in the past. Jan 03, Laura Cushing rated it liked it. The book is really a collection of articles written by the author over the years. A lot of them dealt more with children with autism and aspergers than they did adult topics, and therefore weren't entirely relevant to me.

I did however recognize some of the behaviors and difficulties I had as a child. I would recommend this book to the parents of a child on the spectrum more My rating: I would recommend this book to the parents of a child on the spectrum more than I would an adult with asperger's or autism, particularly one that wasn't diagnosed until later in life. That being said, there is a lot of good information here.

The articles are well-written, and easy for a lay person with little experience on the science of the topic to read. The subject manner is presented in an engaging way, and the topics are divided up up into chapters with interrelated articles so you can easily find a topic if you want to read about something specific. The author herself is on the spectrum, and therefore her knowledge on the topics is personal as well as professional. Mar 06, D. I think highly of Temple and admire her advocacy and openness when it comes to sharing her views as a woman with ASD.

There is a lot of valuable information in this book, especially for those just exploring the autism spectrum. I disagree with some of Temple's ideas and approaches to parenting and educating children on the spectrum. The key thing for me to remember whilst reading is that this is the way Temple sees it based on her experiences. This book is a worthwhile read for parents and educa I think highly of Temple and admire her advocacy and openness when it comes to sharing her views as a woman with ASD.

This book is a worthwhile read for parents and educators who can remember that all of us, ASD or NT, are individuals. Whilst ASD children obviously share specific challenges and issues, there is no cut and dry "one size fits all" approach that works across the board. Aug 20, David rated it really liked it. Compilation of short articles about various aspects of autism and Asperger's based in large part on her own experience of being autistic.

Always iffy to draw general conclusions from one's own experience i had tremendous noise sensitivity, so people with autism are noise sensitive , but she supplements the personal anecdotes with information gleaned from people who write her or come to hear her speak, as well as more systematic research. Her ability to analyze the condition objectively, acknowl Compilation of short articles about various aspects of autism and Asperger's based in large part on her own experience of being autistic.

Her ability to analyze the condition objectively, acknowledge variability in people's symptoms and experiences, and communicate to "neurotypicals" is outstanding. Aug 19, Rebecca Carlsen rated it really liked it. It is a collection of articles she has written covering every aspect of autism and, because she has Autism herself, is really insightful, concise, and logical, with the unique perspective of someone on the Autism Spectrum. I highly recommend this book - especially to parents of children with an ASD.

I am definitely going to read more of her books. Jun 06, Loraine Langley added it. It is great to have the insight of someone who actually is Autistic rather than someone who has only studied those who are Autistic. It gives a whole new perspective on the daily situations and life of a person with opposed to those without. The Way I See It was largely overlooked by consumers upon its release. The Way I See It was met with generally positive reviews from critics.

At Metacritic , which assigns a normalized rating out of to reviews from mainstream publications, the album received an average score of 79, based on 20 reviews. He played 10 shows a day at the Apollo. Before the album's release, Saadiq had toured Europe during the summer in The Way I See It was an exemplary release of the classic soul revival during its peak in Everything sounds exactly like it did back in the day. Not to take away from Amy, but this is the real shit. For Raphael Saadiq, there's a glowing vibrancy in soul music that allows him to work out themes and ideas.

Six years later, he tried to dazzle Maxwell in his own reflected glory. Six years later yet again, he outd[id] himself with a fearless return to retro. Credits are adapted from the album's liner notes. From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. August 5, " Yard Dash " Released: May 27, "Let's Take a Walk" Released: August 7, "Staying in Love" Released: I felt like that style of music works all over the world, and I wanted to make a contribution in '08 and '09 and '10 and create something that would take me around the world.

Black and White: The Way I See It by Richard Williams

Archived from the original on September 21, Retrieved May 5, Retrieved March 27, Archived from the original on Retrieved April 6, A class act on a soul mission". Retrieved April 3, The Way I See It". Retrieved March 28, Everything Old is New Again". Throwback To That 60s Soul". Retrieved April 7, Retrieved April 21, Retrieved May 30, Compressor Audio Compression ". The New York Times Company.

Metal Gods and Idols Past". The New York Times. Retrieved September 18, The New York Observer.

The Way I See Things

Archived from the original on August 19, Observer Music Monthly section, p. Retrieved September 19, Retrieved March 30, Archived from the original on March 31, Retrieved June 14, Archived from the original on June 7, Archived from the original on January 1, Retrieved September 20, Archived from the original on September 3, The way I see it". Retrieved June 10, Raphael Saadiq "Staying In Love " ". The Dallas Morning News. Retrieved September 17, Also the wonderful stories of Melissa hanging out with Michael Landon's daughter, family, friends, people from the show and her relationship with them.

I don't want to give away to much, for those who haven't read it yet, but know this it was defintely worth reading. Nov 13, Kristin rated it did not like it Shelves: This may be the worst Little House memoir of all. It was so unbelievably dull. At the time I read it my life was extremely stressful and this book certainly didn't tax my brain and it enabled me to fall asleep each night with ease. I have to wonder what the point of this book was? To relive a cherished time in America's golden age of wholesome TV? To put to rest the rumors that she was unf This may be the worst Little House memoir of all.

To put to rest the rumors that she was unfriendly and difficult? Or even to tell her side of the story? Equally bizarre is when describing something that might actually be interesting she writes it in a screen play format Lest you try to ferret out any emotion from her whatsoever. This was such a strange book. Even some of her pictures where copies of newspaper clippings etc. The very few family pictures she included were years old and there were absolutely zero photos of her parents.

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In fact, there is hardly any biographical information from her life prior to Little House. It is strange to read a "memoir" with such little personal content. There is a bit more at the end of the book about meeting her husband and having her children. But it still lacks any depth and is so detached and bland that who cares by this point anyway. After reading this book it doesn't appear that she had any friends on the set or that she keeps in touch with anyone.

From information gleaned from reading both Melissa Gilbert's book and Alison Arngrim's book she doesn't come to any Little House reunions. Things like this only lend credence to the claims of her former costars about her onset behavior. There is no reason to read this book.


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Watch the DVDs and imagine her voice describing everything. Boring with a capital B. Jan 05, Cheryl Gatling added it. Remember that opening scene to The Little House on the Prairie, when the girls were running downhill in a field of wildflowers? Well, nothing was actually growing at that time of year, and all the flowers were plastic, stuck into the ground on little wires. That's the kind of fun thing you learn reading this book. Word on the street says that this is one dull memoir, and by today's standards, it is.

Melissa Anderson called Melissa Sue Anderson back in the day was never abused, never did drugs, Remember that opening scene to The Little House on the Prairie, when the girls were running downhill in a field of wildflowers? Melissa Anderson called Melissa Sue Anderson back in the day was never abused, never did drugs, and never sank into crime. She loved being on Little House, has wonderful memories, was delighted that she got to meet so many famous people Johnny Cash, Frank Sinatra, Steven Spielberg to name a few. She grew up to get married and stay married, and raise normal children.

My husband gave me this book because, like most little girls of my generation, I watched Little House religiously. It was fun to get a look behind the scenes. It was hot on location in California, especially wearing long sleeves and tights, so the actors all had sweat rolling down them. Michael Landon made all the cast members wear heavy makeup so they would match his olive-toned skin. Michael Landon was autocratic on the set, but still managed to be a kindly father-figure to Melissa.

The closest thing to scandal here is that Michael disappointed Melissa by having an affair with her stand-in and smoking marijuana. But they remained friends. If you loved Little House, you'll want to read this. If you weren't a big fan, probably not. May 19, Carolyn rated it really liked it. I really enjoyed this book. I appreciate Melissa Anderson's clean approach to telling her story which means "no use of profanity. Melissa Anderson's story shows that actors and actresses can lead a clean life without constant marriage breakups and having sex with every person one meets.

She has a lot of morals about her that is highly appreciated. This is a book tha I really enjoyed this book. This is a book that teenagers can read and learn from. The only reason I did not give this book five stars is because of Melissa Anderson's overuse of summaries from the Little House episodes. Instead, I would have liked to have heard more about her relationships with the cast of Little House.

I have seen every episode of Little House and did not need a summary of each episode. Near the end of the book, I bypassed a few summaries because I had tired of reading them. With that exception, I think the book was a great read and would highly recommend it to other readers. Apr 09, Lori rated it really liked it. When I heard about this book, I literally could not wait to dive into it. I was like a kid on Christmas morning, opening the book with the same type of awe usually afforded to that Red Ryder BB gun or Barbie's deluxe penthouse.

I loved the books when I was little, I loved the television show and I love reading about production of the show and what went on behind the scenes. The Way I See It is Melissa Anderson's tale of growing up on the set of one of the most beloved and iconic television shows of the s, from her initial audition to taping her last episode seven years later. The book itself is broken into sections for each year of the show, with specific episodes highlighted.

Anderson recounts behind the scenes tales of everything from a Dinty Moore beef stew overload what the cast members ate during meal scenes where they had stew to disputes between co-stars. Michael Landon and Karen Grassle the actress who played Caroline Ingalls would apparently butt heads throughout much of the run of the show. Grassle was a classically trained actress who wished to have a more significant role on the show, against Landon's wishes.

Landon himself was revealed as a controlling jokester with a mean streak who could be difficult to work with, particularly once he began an affair with Anderson's stand-in, but who could still remain a compassionate and caring man. Anderson herself did not go without a bit of friction, as she recounted the awkwardness between herself and co-star Radames Pera, who played early love interest John Sanderson, and their first kiss.

The Way I See It: A Personal Look at Autism & Asperger's

Anderson recounts these instances with class and grace, without resorting to mudslinging or name calling that is often peppered in Hollywood memoirs. Also missing from Ms. Anderson's memoir, happily, is the all too tragic tale of alcohol, drugs and other vices that are too common in child actors today. Anderson appears to have escaped unscathed from the downside of the entertainment biz and she comes across as a very level headed and secure adult.

I finished this book in two or three days. It was an easy read and fun one, albeit one without dirt and gossip. I very much enjoyed Ms. Anderson's memories of the show once Mary went blind and appreciated how terrified she herself was to take on such an enormous undertaking and remember, she herself was only fifteen when she had to portray a newly blind teenager, which she did stunningly. Any readers that are looking for a tabloid type of recounting will be disappointed and I encourage those readers not to pick up this book. For those readers who love and appreciate Little House on the Prairie, this book will be a fun and informative read.

As the title suggests, this is not Melissa Anderson's complete biography so don't approach it as such. It's her life during the run of Little House, so it does include the performances she gave on films and television shows between and but nothing prior or since. Was there anything I found disappointing in the book? I do wish there had been more mentioned about the relationship between Ms. I also would have loved reading a behind the scenes recap on each and every single Little House episode but, of course, that would have increased the size of the book exponentially.

All things considered, I enjoyed my time back on the prairie with Ms. Anderson and wouldn't hesitate to recommend the book. Apr 06, Amy rated it it was amazing Shelves: In the book, Melissa says that if she could advise child actors, she would tell them: Make sure you have something you can fall back on. Make sure your life doesn't only revolve around show business. Develop different interests and, most of all, get to know the great person that is way down deep. Spend your hard-earned money wisely. Furthering your education is a good idea. Make the most of Finally Make the most of the opportunity you've been given; appreciate it, but don't perceive it as the Be All, End All.

I think this is excellent advice! Anderson describes her life using her favorite episodes of Little House as a guideline. The best thing is that many of her favorites are also mine, as well. Also, I learned that Michael Landon's second wife was not originally a make-up artist on the show. Rather, she was Anderson's double on the show. Finally, Anderson included one of my favorite quotes from the show as spoken by Patricia Neal's character: Remember me with smiles and laughter, For that's the way I'll remember you all.

If you can only remember me with tears, Then don't remember me at all. Jan 18, Kim rated it did not like it Shelves: Apparently, her "research" for this book involved watching every old episode of the show, and giving her memories from the shooting of each. Each chapter contains a episode summary form one or two shows, with passive-aggressive stabs at her co-stars sprinkled throughout.

I picked up this book, because I kind of felt she was being portrayed unfairly by her costars in their memoirs What do you know: She is a know-it-all and almost completely unbearable. As a tv fanatic, I am not charmed by a yr old who calls Michael Landon "Mike" from their first meeting, and is pissy that Laura Ingalls Wilder didnt write enough story line about Mary. How rude of her not to write a part juicy enough for a pretentious preteen, who lands the role of her sister some 75 years later I would give this book a half star if I could.

It was horrible and gives autobiographies a bad name. Having read Melissa Gilbert's memoir and Alison Angrim, I was looking forward to the third take on growing up in the Little House series. Melissa Sue Anderson really did not understand the point. This book did not mention her parents or life before she auditioned for the series. You don't know until the last page whether or not she had siblings. You have only a couple of pages on her husband and k I would give this book a half star if I could. You have only a couple of pages on her husband and kids. What she did instead is write about the plot of each episode she was in in detail.

She does not tell what it was like to shoot the episodes or much about her co-stars. She tells us instead what Mary went through. I knew that from watching the episode and learned nothing new here. Jul 10, Sara rated it it was ok Shelves: Who is Melissa Anderson? I hadn't a clue before and I haven't a clue now.

Not as good as Melissa Gilbert's bio. Not as good as Alison Arngrid's, either. Is she hiding something? Apr 09, Sharon rated it it was amazing Shelves: After reading some of the other reviews, I was a little nervous about reading this book, but I am finding the book to be charming. It is as though little Mary Ingalls was writing it.

Like some other reviewers have stated, it is apparent that Melissa is watching the episodes as she's writing it. I find that to be interesting because it's as though one is sitting beside her watching the episodes with her as she shares her personal experiences, her thoughts and views of the episodes and those that After reading some of the other reviews, I was a little nervous about reading this book, but I am finding the book to be charming. I find that to be interesting because it's as though one is sitting beside her watching the episodes with her as she shares her personal experiences, her thoughts and views of the episodes and those that were involved in the making of those episodes.

I find it refreshing that she doesn't trash her co-stars or deliver the dirt on everyone she's worked with. I do find it interesting to learn little-known, behind-the-scenes details about how some of the episodes were made. I'm glad I chose to read Melissa Anderson's book first because it gave me a review of the series and is just such a refreshing look at the events and characters of that show.