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Mutes are OK but I have heard they can lead to excessively aggressive plucking so as to hear the muted note adequately and a potentially concomitant hand injury.

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My audience is two robots and a small bear. But they can be critical! I teach privately for a living, and love doing so. January 3, at 9: Quick note — I discovered something perhaps quite relevant. Having a small span pinky to index, or to thumb does not necessarily imply small hands. It could mean your hands are inflexible, laterally. I did some measurements and my hands are overall average-sized. But my span is the smallest of all of us. But for someone on a budget, or someone with a laminate top guitar who does not want to worry about what a solid top might do in really low humidity conditions, might a capo on the first fret be a good solution?

It would reduce the scale from to Capos can be a bit bothersome for first position fretting e. But it would preserve the comfortable body size and string spacing. Is there a reason not to do it longer-term? January 4, at 4: Hi Rob, I love what you do. I used to play the cello, but it was too big of a voice for me. My teacher said I chose the cello because I thought I could hide behind it.

I played for a long time without looking at my right hand, just listening to the sound of my guitar, and I found a sound that I really like.


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Then I discovered your website and low and behold my right hand position is the same as yours! Perhaps this is a good omen. Thank you for all of your amazing videos. January 4, at 8: January 31, at Hi Rob — just a quick follow-up comment, and one question. It may be mathematically equal to a I get a ton more sympathetic vibrations, especially with 3rd string A2 and open 5th string A3. But there are others, less obvious.

The Romantic Guitar

That makes for quite a wide neck compared to a dedicated short-scale guitar. Bottom line, using a capo might mimic some of the essence of having a short-scale guitar, but it falls short in a number of areas of being equivalent. Strangely, they do not state that there is a variation in nut width between these models. I find it hard to believe. Do you think your Senorita model had a smaller nut, say mm? January 31, at 7: But, generally speaking, one can over-think these things. March 26, at 4: Im looking for a soft, floaty almost Lute like tone.

Im considering a small bodied Torres size guitar in either a mm or mm scale length. I wanted to ask if the scale length makes a tonal difference and would this guitar give me the tone Im looking for. The Viennese guitars by the likes of Stauffer, Reis, etc, have a more transparent tone, and often come in short string lengths of 59cms to 61cms. The Spanish school of Panormo and others, tend to have a fatter, warmer sound. The French school of Lacotes and the like, lie somewhere in between.

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Their string lengths average cms. I think you have a lot of listening to do! It had 5 single strings, inlaid brass frets, a long neck relative to string length the fretboard meeting the body at the 11th fret , a pegged bridge and a characteristic figure-8 shaped tuning head. It lacked only a sixth string to make it identical with the early romantic guitar. The earliest extant six-string guitar was built in by Gaetano Vinaccia — after [5] [6] in Naples, Italy.

The Vinaccia family of luthiers is also known for developing the mandolin. This guitar shows no sign of modification from a double-course guitar.

Moretti's 6-string method appeared in Around the same time France also began to produce guitars with six single courses and Spain soon followed. Italian, French, and Spanish six-string guitars differed from the baroque guitar in similar ways. In addition to the advances already mentioned the guitar was gradually given more pronounced curves and a larger body while ornamentation was more restrained, remaining mostly around the edges of the body and the sound hole, which lacked a decorative rose to allow more volume.

Frets were no longer of tied gut but fixed strips of some harder material, first ebony or ivory then metal. Wooden pegs were later replaced by metal tuning machines. The many instructional books of the time show no standard playing technique but rather a reliance upon earlier traditions. For example, they often recommend that the right hand be supported on the guitar's table although the Spanish guitarist Nicario Juaralde took the modern view, warning against a loss of right-hand freedom. The thumb and first two fingers were mainly used for plucking with, in the 19th century, a free stroke tirando more commonly than the rest stroke apoyando that was favoured in the 20th century.

Unlike most classical guitarists today, players were divided as to whether or not use fingernails.

Romantic guitar - Wikiwand

Fernando Sor, for example, did not use them while his compatriot Dionisio Aguado did. The narrower fretboard of the romantic guitar allowed the left-hand thumb to be used by some guitarists to fret the sixth string although Fernando Sor deprecates this in his method , recommending that the left-hand thumb remain at the rear centre of the neck and noting that the "high" thumb position aids neither bass-string fingering nor support of the guitar.

Listen to this article Thanks for reporting this video! It had 5 single strings, inlaid brass frets, a long neck relative to string length the fretboard meeting the body at the 11th fret , a pegged bridge and a characteristic figure-8 shaped tuning head. It lacked only a sixth string to make it identical with the early romantic guitar.

The earliest extant six-string guitar was built in by Gaetano Vinaccia — after [5] [6] in Naples, Italy. The Vinaccia family of luthiers is also known for developing the mandolin. This guitar shows no sign of modification from a double-course guitar. Moretti's 6-string method appeared in Around the same time France also began to produce guitars with six single courses and Spain soon followed. Italian, French, and Spanish six-string guitars differed from the baroque guitar in similar ways.

In addition to the advances already mentioned the guitar was gradually given more pronounced curves and a larger body while ornamentation was more restrained, remaining mostly around the edges of the body and the sound hole, which lacked a decorative rose to allow more volume. Frets were no longer of tied gut but fixed strips of some harder material, first ebony or ivory then metal. Wooden pegs were later replaced by metal tuning machines.

The many instructional books of the time show no standard playing technique but rather a reliance upon earlier traditions. For example, they often recommend that the right hand be supported on the guitar's table although the Spanish guitarist Nicario Juaralde took the modern view, warning against a loss of right-hand freedom.