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Rose Sabin Goodreads Author. Windspeaker Kyla Cren gathers news from the wind and passes on to her village its warnings about mindstealers, creatures that rob human minds, leaving their victims insensible and helpless. Because Kyla's parents were victims of mindstealers, the need for revenge consumes her. She attacks two mindstealers and rescues their victim, but gets no satisfaction from the act.

The Windspeaker Kyla Cren gathers news from the wind and passes on to her village its warnings about mindstealers, creatures that rob human minds, leaving their victims insensible and helpless. The ungrateful victim, a powerful mage, thrusts upon her the care of Claid, who appears to be an appealing young child.

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He's not a child, the Mage Alair declares, and challenges her to discover what Claid really is. That challenge sends her from her native village on a journey of discovery that takes her into the wider world beyond her isolated valley, a world in which machines have replaced magic. Harrowing experiences teach her more about herself than about Claid and eventually bring her back to Mage Alair, whom she joins in a scheme to destroy the mindstealers, a plan which might result in tragedy but which could also lead Kyla to the full truth about Claid's nature and her own.

Paperback , pages. Published November 1st by Double Dragon Publishing. To see what your friends thought of this book, please sign up. To ask other readers questions about Mistress of the Wind , please sign up. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia.


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Dec 29, Jenny rated it it was amazing. This is a thoroughly absorbing story from start to finish. I found the windspeaker Kyra to be a compelling protagonist - she has a sad backstory but a strong will that propels the action. It was an excellent read. Mar 01, Ana Tesserell rated it it was amazing Recommends it for: Only she holds no title as of yet.

And Kyla has a personal beef with the mindstealers. I was very curious to see what led to the extinction of this job or whether it still exists in the sequels and is just being held secret from the other Provinces or the Triumvirate is keeping it a secret. Predictably, we also get introduce to the Mage Alair, the Power-Giver in this book. A very mysterious part, or at least was he was until he got explained more in this book.

I forced myself to read only 3 chapters per day to make it last longer. The struggle between giving in to what you see and daring to see beyond. The deception is real. These characters will go down in the history of Arucadi, at least as far as the Community is concerned, and they do deal with some stuff of epic proportions. Knows how to make you root for the main character. Her characters think of all the possibilities when presented of a riddle, and those coincide with the exact same possibilities the reader is considering at that point. Her plots are always engaging and she is my favorite fantasy author.

I like the idea that anyone can be redempted. I do believe this is an appropiate first book in the Arucadi series, I am pleased with the explanations given for certain things. I do like how almost each of the provinces has been mentioned once, but I would like a book where they are all mentioned together and someone travels everywhere or one person from each province come together.

The series feels a bit… fragmented like this. Scattered throughout a very long period of time, each installment dealing with one of the 12 Provinces. This is my only complaint about it. I wish for someone sometime to connect all the events in some way, either with his omniscience or by learning of all the major events we the readers have witnessed. Feb 19, Sam rated it really liked it Shelves: I won a copy of this book in a First Reads Giveaway.

Mistress of the Wind follows Kyla, a windspeaker, as she embarks on an unintended journey for answers behind Claid, whom is thrusted upon her possession without her consent, and ultimately stopping the Mindstealers through a third person narrative. The mystery of figuring out what Claid really is kept me hooked from page to page.

And boy, the author sure kno I won a copy of this book in a First Reads Giveaway. And boy, the author sure knows how to push her characters. My heart utterly felt for Kyla through the Line's End segment of the book. I could really feel Kyla's emotions and I ended up being frustrated by her predicament. Which is a good thing as this means that the story was able to invoke such an emotion from me I don't always end up emotionally invested in every book I read. The ending is bittersweet but for me it sits just fine I really couldn't imagine it ending any other way.

Though, despite how sad it is, I think it works. It is kinda nice to see that it is not a completely happy ending. That Alair residing within a crystal was the price to pay for the good things that happened. Or maybe I just watch too much Once Upon a Time. Steve rated it really liked it Mar 17, Marylou Hess rated it it was amazing Mar 08, Natalia Pawlowska rated it it was amazing Mar 17, Lissaleo marked it as to-read Feb 16, He has to jump through a bunch of hoops to defeat the enchantment.

One of those is finding a girl to share his castle with for a year. During the day he's a bear, at n The beginning of this was exactly what I look for in a fairytale retelling. During the day he's a bear, at night, a man for the sexy times. Enter the worst choice he could have made in whom he chose to live with, Astrid. People, stubbornness does not always equal strength. Sometimes it equals stupidity, as in the case of this female lead. What I did take issue with was her lack of remorse. He tells her it would endanger them both, endanger them all.

This is what it led to: Just replace the panda with something like a polar bear and the truck with all of their enemies and you get the picture. The dumbass lights up a candle that her mother snuck her and lays eyes on him. Of course, everything is now ruined. What was missing for me was her learning something from it.

You have to take a troll for a wife? Everyone in your kingdom is now in jeopardy? One thing that confused me was the message on the ARC site that I picked this up from. It said something along the lines of this being intended for adult readers. My perverted little self was disappointed by that after getting my hopes up over that disclaimer. So, a good retelling in that it kept true to the original story even while greatly building upon it but my irritation with the female lead dragged this down from a 3.

View all 15 comments. I've always loved fairy tales. But when I was at university, doing research for a history paper on the witch hunts of the 17th Century, I came across a really interesting but totally unrelated: It was fantastic, and mind-blowing. I suddenly saw the subversion in the tales. Even with the whitewashing that went on in the Victorian era to make fairy tales moral tales and warnings, especially to girls, to be good, and obedient and incuriou I've always loved fairy tales.

Even with the whitewashing that went on in the Victorian era to make fairy tales moral tales and warnings, especially to girls, to be good, and obedient and incurious, I realized one could read a subtext to the tale. Or rather, I finally understood why I loved them so much.


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I think I'd subconsciously understood the deeper layers, but now I could trace those layers better. I started thinking about writing a book based on one of my favorite fairy tales, East of the Sun, West of the Moon, and ended up weaving some other myths through the tale, to have the story that is Mistress of the Wind.

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But I really enjoyed the fact that at its heart, I've kept it as a story on a number of levels, just like the original. It can be about a woman who meets an enchanted prince, falls in love with him and then, when a combination of the circumstances of his enchantment and her actions cause him to be taken from her, she goes on a long search to find and rescue him, getting help from people along the way. Or it could be about a woman coming into her power, and mastering the facets of her personality and understanding her faults and her strengths so that she is able to take on anything that is thrown at her with a clear idea of her worth, and it could be both those things at once.

And I don't push the second interpretation on the reader. Some readers have 'got' it straight away, and I totally, totally love that. The challenge with Mistress of the Wind, given I wanted to remain true to the original fairy tale, was to give Astrid a good reason to go against Bjorn's request to see him as a man, which is the catalyst for her having to go on her quest. The consequences of her doing so are huge, to both her and Bjorn, and I really had to create a compelling situation for her to act against his wishes.

If she doesn't do it, however, the story is over, they win and everyone lives happily ever after. Unfortunately for them, they have to work a little harder for their happy ending than that. I used a number of motivations. The first was genuine curiosity. Astrid wants to see Bjorn as a man. Of course she does. He is her lover and which of us wouldn't want to know what the person we love looks like? Her mother's fear of what he is also spurs that. She wants to be able to reassure her mother that the man she has chosen is not a monster.

Bjorn himself has some responsibility. He could have taken Astrid to his palace and left her alone. But by involving her, drawing her into the complexities of the curse and forming the strong bond that he does with her, he blunts the importance of her never seeing him as a man to her.

Of course, the loneliness and waste it would be to not spend time together would be acute, which is why he does as he does, but it is one of those damned if you do, damned if you don't things. Astrid's personality plays a roles as well. She knows she is worthy of respect, if not love, just for being who she is, and so she has fought against her father's attempts to beat her down and break her.

That makes it extremely hard for her to accept some of the conditions that are set on her behaviour by her lover. While she fights against the literal, and figurative, burying of her personality and her need to be free, by her imprisonment in the heart of a mountain, she tries to accommodate his need for her to never see him as a man, to stay inside, to stay in the dark, but it is eating away at her.

Even though Bjorn, her lover, tells her that the conditions of his enchantment are the only things making him hold her back, she sees what he cannot, that his enchanter is merely delaying the end. That the evil queen has no intention of letting him win, and if he does, she will have nothing to lose by reneging on their agreement. Astrid only breaks the enchantment conditions out of concern for his life - what do the rules mean if he is dead, after all? She is proactive, and she wants to do. To fight rather than wait at someone else's pleasure, for something she is sure will not be granted, no matter if she and Bjorn follow the conditions or not.

The consequences of that act drive the second part of the book, where Astrid has to confront her faults and her power, and decide how to control them. It was a fine line to walk and one which continually challenged me. I hope you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it. Dec 17, Carol [Goodreads Addict] rated it liked it Shelves: I have not read this fairy tale so I can make no comparisons. Astrid has always been different. She talks to the wind, it tells her things. But she has never understood why. She and her family are very poor. They barely survive on their run down farm.

Mistress of the Wind

Her father is a very angry man and treats her, her siblings and her mother horribly, never hesitating to use his fists when he is ang Mistress of the Wind by Michelle Diener is an adult retelling of the fairy tale, East of the Sun, West of the Moon. Her father is a very angry man and treats her, her siblings and her mother horribly, never hesitating to use his fists when he is angry. Bjorn is the Prince of the mountain. He has had a hex put on him by the evil Queen of the trolls. He has been turned into a huge bear. He has dreamed for years of a beautiful young girl and the evil Queen has given him one year to find her.

When Bjorn does find Astrid, he knows she is the one. He offers her family gold if she will go with him willingly. Of course Astrid will choose to go with him for the chance to escape her father and to offer her mother a better life. But there is much evil that waits for Astrid and Bjorn. The Troll Queen is not ready to give up.

And there are others that would harm Bjorn and Astrid. There are still things that Astrid will discover about herself as well. About her power with the wind. This book had all the makings of a fairy tale, the handsome prince, beautiful maiden, evil queen. I did enjoy it but I think that perhaps this was just not the perfect book for me. I did speed through it and could easily envision the beautiful bear with his maiden sitting astride him speeding through the forest.

But, the many magical creatures were all just a bit much for me. So I have to say that it was just an ok read for me but I do believe that is just more personal preference, nothing to do with the writing itself. Thank you to Netgalley and Season Publishing for giving me the opportunity to read this book. View all 11 comments. Mlpmom Book Reviewer I know what you mean and I know it seems weird because I enjoy all things paranormal but for some reason anything high fantasy I really struggle with!

Jan 24, Carol [Goodreads Addict] Lisa wrote: D" Thank you so much, Lisa! Despite being largely underrated, East of the Sun, West of the Moon remains one of my favorite fairy tales which is why I was so pleased to see it tackled by author Michelle Diener. Having made a name for herself writing historic fiction, I wasn't sure she could pull off jumping genres, but having enjoyed The Emperor's Conspiracy I felt I had little to lose in picking up Mistress of the Wind.

Now, I'll be straight with you, adaptations are hard to review. The content by nature is not original, b Despite being largely underrated, East of the Sun, West of the Moon remains one of my favorite fairy tales which is why I was so pleased to see it tackled by author Michelle Diener. The content by nature is not original, but if an author adds too much to the story they risk offending their audience by treading too far from the beaten path. Generally speaking, writers solve this dilemma by offering up elaborate descriptions and making minor adjustments or subtle changes to the original story.

This leaves reviewers in an awkward position as discussing these details often spoils the plot and that's really not our goal. Suffice it to say, Diener's adaptation retains the familiar elements of the original, echoing both the structure and spirit of the classic, but true to form, she puts her own spin both the plot and the narrative, crafting an intricately alluring tale of self-sacrifice, steadfast devotion and enduring love.

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Jul 26, Paige Bookdragon rated it it was ok Shelves: I'm really not a fan of her fantasy works. Dec 16, Douglas Meeks rated it really liked it. It seems that I have a soft spot for stories that use old fairy tales as a basic structure. This one is no exception and having an evil stepmother as the villain just seemed right for this story but she was much more than just an evil stepmother. This is loosely based on an old Norse type fairly tale that I have never read so it seems that it is just as great a story with or without any prior knowledge. The story of Bjorn and Astrid is engaging and heartfelt, it is a theme used by storytellers all It seems that I have a soft spot for stories that use old fairy tales as a basic structure.

The story of Bjorn and Astrid is engaging and heartfelt, it is a theme used by storytellers all over the world about the cursed prince and the beautiful and devoted princess. The thing here is that this is not an easy journey nor is Astrid what she seems at first. You will enjoy this story along with the discovery of powers in Astrid she never knew and her struggles to have her prince.

Astrid has a long hard road ahead to beat back the powers she has to fight to try to make this a "happy ever after" story. I give this 5 Star story 4 Stars only because most of the secondary characters are a bit 2 dimensional but in most fairly tales that is the way it is, you will love this story and add it to things you can share with your children if you wish although it is probably a bit above PG in a couple of places. This is a love story after all: Dec 04, Dianne rated it it was amazing Shelves: Dec 13, Blodeuedd Finland rated it really liked it Shelves: I have always liked this fairy tale, maybe my earliest memory of it was the Psyche one, or the Swedish version something prince hat under the mountain.

They are each different but East of the Wind became my favorite of them. I guess I connected to the fairytale better than any other. And Diener sure made it her fairytale too, I do love remakes and this one stays very true and still not. It's the story about an enchanting prince named Bjorn, poor thing can't do much. Astrid, the poor woodcutter' I have always liked this fairy tale, maybe my earliest memory of it was the Psyche one, or the Swedish version something prince hat under the mountain.

Astrid, the poor woodcutter's daughter could be a savior, but as the story go, something happens. Maybe that is why I like the story, there is no damsel in distress. Instead it is Astrid who sets off on a journey to save her prince. It's not always easy but she does not stop before she is reunited with her love.

So she is the hero of the story. The book is light and I read it fast. First, when I start a Diener book I always read pages in a go, and then I have to do something else. Same thing this time, pages and the rest later. The pages sure fly by fast. A delightful story with heartache and pain in it too. I'd love to read more. Do you hear that high pitched screaming sound? Cause this book was so good I just hovered in the perpetual shrieking zone for a majority of it.

East of the Sun and West of the Moon has always been a personal favorite fairytale of mine, since I was a little girl. It's a take on Eros and Pysche, but it's polar bears, witches, and magic. I mean come on! It's almost as good as the Snow Queen and there's nothing more wondrous than a desolated snowy wasteland with Hags and stolen lovers. Mi Do you hear that high pitched screaming sound? Michelle did wonders with this book. The story it's based on is already richly filled with imagery and culture, but this takes the cake. Every location is filled with visions of tree people, gnarled stone creatures, air sprites, water hags, I could go on and on.

It's just absolutely lovely. And as a testament to how skillfully this author wields her words? She makes you fall in love with a polar bear. I'm so glad she kept this part of the story haha. East of the Sun and West of the Moon always has a cursed prince and a polar bear. He was kind, he was gentle, he was a little pushy with the whole "I've been gone a year let's have sex" but at least was a gentleman about it. And more importantly for me he was weak in moments and let Astrid do what she has to do. Having been beaten down her whole life, she remained strong and confident.

This is what I like to see female characters look like, and this is what I want young women everywhere to read. Just because people were afraid of her, just because she didn't have a super strong support system, did NOT make her less of a person. Can we just read that again? She is NOT less of a person based on the opinions of others. I feel like we should all say that together, but I won't make you. Read this book, it's well worth your time. This review can also be found on my book review blog -Spare Reads- A copy of the book was kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

If you are a frequent reader of this blog, you know I'm a huge fan of fairy tale retellings. I love the fresh voice and delightfulness that come with each new add-ons and spin-offs. So when I finally got my hands on Mistress of the Wind, I was nothing less than thrilled. Unfortunately, after a fairly promising start, Mistress of the Wind f This review can also be found on my book review blog -Spare Reads- A copy of the book was kindly provided by the publisher in exchange for an honest review.

Unfortunately, after a fairly promising start, Mistress of the Wind fell terribly short to all my expectations. As has been mentioned in the synopsis, Mistress of the Wind is a retelling of the fairy tale East of the Sun, West of the Moon. Though you may not be familiar with this Norwegian folk tale, its setting is somewhat similar to Beauty and the Beast with Bjorn being the enchanted Beast and Astrid being the fierce Beauty. In order to retain balance in his realm, Bjorn must defeat his vicious and powerful stepmother, a troll queen, by fulfilling her tricky bargain.

One wrong move and he would lose both his kingdom and himself, perhaps his lover as well, though he is not in this game alone.

Mistress Of The Wind

The deal holds another critical piece, Astrid, the girl who is meant to be and the girl who would sacrifice everything to be with him. If I had not read up on the fairy tale beforehand, I might have a better experience with this book. Because rather than incorporating creative twists to the original story, Mistress of the Wind recounts the tale in almost the same exact way as before with no shiny frostings on top. There are indeed more flesh and details filled into the original story skeleton, but overall it still lacks imagination and creativity.

The second half of the book in particular becomes extremely predictable and slightly repetitive when Astrid starts off her journey to the troll queen's palace. One thing that baffled me the most is the fact that I was so detached from this book. Rarely do I feel completely indifferent about a story, let alone my favorite fairy tale retellings, I have always been able to establish some sort of connections with the book, may it be the plot or the characters, total hatred or absolute admiration.

For Mistress of the Wind however, there was not a single moment when I felt I really cared about the outcome or the ending of Bjorn and Astrid's tale. I was not drawn into their world and I did not invest much at all into the story. I have pondered on the possible reasons behind this for quite some time and I think I have come to a conclusion - it's all because of poor characterizations. Throughout the story, Michelle Diener introduced a good deal of characters to us readers: Bjorn, Astrid, Astrid's family, Jorgen, Norga, etc.

Putting all the secondary characters aside, neither of the two MCs had me falling for them head over heels. Astrid had some potentials in the beginning but gradually lost her confident and brave self later on and turned into someone who is dull and downright forgettable. After reading this book, I cannot help but wonder whether or not Michelle Diener wrote this story with an intention to market it as a MG novel instead. Because no matter how I evaluate it, Mistress of the Wind lacks both complexity and depth to its characters and plots.

It would probably be more suitable for a much younger audience. Jul 11, Kara rated it it was amazing Shelves: Definitely putting it in the top three. This version is heavily steeped in Nordic mythology and we see just what happens when gods and monsters play politics.

However, before her powers even come into play, she has a stubbornness that knocks her polar bear lover back on his heels in surprise at the strength she will show in impossible situations. Although he really should have stopped being surprised by anything she says or does after he learned she brings an ax to bed when she feels threatened.

An epic quest, an amazing cast of characters, a classic love story, and overall a book that left me bereft when I got to the end because I wanted it to keep going! Dec 07, Kara-karina rated it really liked it. It's sweet, lovely and airy. There are no surprises and you don't have to guess how it ends. I would have loved a different, deeper and more detailed story, but Michelle Diener preferred to stay true to the fairy tale format which left me pleased but hungry for more. Bjorn is mostly a desire object of the book, and it's Astrid who we follow through her experiences and ordeals to get him back.

She is curious and feisty and keeps thwarting everything and everyone who underestimates her because she is a young woman. Good on you, girl! The best parts for me though were three women and four winds, especially Northern Wind who was my favorite character of the story. I can not say much about the plot because anyone familiar with this story knows how it ends, but I am glad, Michelle plans this type of fairy tale retelling as a series, and I'll enjoy reading more.

Recommended as a light, bookish snack to everyone. Jan 09, Fantasy Literature rated it liked it. In recent years, a number of authors have turned their hands to retelling the story in novel form, expanding the plot and focusing on different aspects of the tale, with varying results. Mistress of the Wind is a new retelling by Michelle Diener, who has written several historical novels before entering fairy-tale land. Dec 02, Darkphoenix rated it really liked it. I have been really looking forward to reading Mistress of the Wind ever since it first released.

I finally got it day before yesterday and read it in one go. I kept my expectations from this book firmly grounded in reasonable territory since I had already read The Golden Apple before this and I did not enjoy it as much as I thought I would. In this book, we meet Bjorn, who was once a prince but is now in the form of a bear.

His predicament is the result of an enchantment from a particularly powe I have been really looking forward to reading Mistress of the Wind ever since it first released. His predicament is the result of an enchantment from a particularly powerful troll, Norda. The conditions are that he has one year to find the girl who might love him and then spend an additional year where she cannot look at his face.

If he succeeds in both of these endeavours, then the spell will be broken and he will be free of the enchantment and from Norda. If, however, he fails, he will have to marry the her daughter. Bjorn eventually finds the girl he thinks will help him break the spell, Astrid. The Mistress of the Wind is a retelling of the fairy tale: East of the Sun, West of the Moon and for the most part sticks pretty close to the tale. In this story, she is the Wind Hag or the Mistress of the Wind and I thought that was a nice touch, that she was powerful in her own right.

In her search for Bjorn, she visits the ends of the earth in search of someone who might know where Norda lives. On her travels she meets the mistresses of the Earth, Water and Fire and all of them help her discover and hone her power and also give her a gift that will help her find and bring back Bjorn.

Part of that was because of the pace of the narrative, which is quite fast, and the other that there was always something happening in the book. There was rarely a lull or a dull moment. The world building was also good and definitely much better than The Golden Apple. I absolutely loved Astrid. She was all the usual things that a book heroine is meant to be: Even after she fell in love with Bjorn, she did not let him dictate her actions.